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July 27, 2005

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Temple3

in setting up this topic, i wanted to explore nuances of work to be done by those black folks who often talk past purposes - directly to ideology, without looking to the multitudes of work that can be done collectively, and where ideology need not enter the picture (at least not immediately)...there is a great deal of work that be done, money that can be made and many lives that can be improved and extended - before we fall out with one another...

best case scenario...build homes, schools, hospitals with some conservative cat you can't stand intellectually, but respect as a person of integrity and vision and commitment - and the only time y'all argue is over a beer or three or five at the lounge you've built to provide a social venue for your collective.

that's the good stuff. and everyone gets healed along the way, but whatever our political stripes, religious tenets, etc., we should reserve the right and preserve the practice of falling out with one another AFTER WORK - and making up BEFORE BED. it's simple...no one goes home mad...no one comes to work mad...handle yo' binis and play nicely in the sandbox.

truly, truly - one love.

cnulan

I can't think of any more binding basis for collective action than ensuring the well-being of our children. The extent of our personal, individual investment in nurturing the children strikes me as a categorical baseline for measuring commitment to community.

Oh, I also believe we're COMPLETELY on our own as regards accomplishing this aim.

cnulan

Let me qualify that last statement;

The socio-economic system in which we're embedded exists to maximize return on shareholder investment. If John Taylor Gatto is to be believed, the well-being of our children doesn't figure into the calculus of this system even as an afterthought.

We have modern processed food and dietary habits conducing to obesity, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and cancer, the rote memorization schooling and indoctrination system, the mass-media entertrainment and indoctrination system, and the medication of children (ritalin) who in prior generations would've been considered *gifted*.

Oh, lest prioritized concern for children as a communal baseline be considered medieval and heteronormative, please bear in mind that YOU were each and everyone of US once children (Y)OURSELVES - and - had someone(s) not shown sacrificial concern for (Y)OUR individual well-being - we would not be equipped to spend cycles bloviating today.

MIB

I believe it's a mistake to separate ideology from a definition of Blackness as we're then reducing 'Black community' to a construct based upon shared aesthetics or genotype. Let us first identify 'Black community' by some of its politics.

Humanistic.
Maternal.
Agrarian.

Around these points a collective already exists. What remains to be seen is when the body will move, or act, on these principles as it last did during the Civil Rights Era.

cnulan

Are the collective tendencies you've termed politics and ideology subsumed by a group psychology possessing qualities that render it distinct - and to a degree immiscible - with the encompassing beast {oops, I mean't collective psychology} that feeds on ours, but has never truly assimilated us?

bibtecario

Enough is known by enough of us to say that it can be, from the outset, as planned a community as BenjaminB. laid out D.C., or the developers laid out a place such as Reston, VA. that has 30 to 50 miles of bike trails that lead directly to D.C.

It can be in a city like Houston were folk can move en masse and say that, as a people, we wish to concentrate on, on top of basic social engineering (ensuring that such a community has skilled and professional tradespeople to be self-sustaining), importing and exporting to places like the Carib. Isles, South America, the Motherland, and China.

We are only alone or limited by our creativity and courage (I for one believe that China can be a tremendous ally if we position ourselves, accordingly). At some point, however, I do contend that we are going to have to contruct some sort of code of conduct or reconstruct some authentic spiritual basis from which we can all be on the same page to operate.

bibtecario

Such a socio-spiritual reconstruction birthing a Black community, in the ideal, would enable such a such a community to be nonaligned with the religious fanaticism on both sides of the present neo-Crusade/Jihad.

bibtecario

The basis of collective action would initially rest upon self-preservation, with a nod to the late Dr. J.H. Clarke here, but secondarily would be the healthy propagation of the community in the microcosm as well as the larger diasporan community in a macrocosmic sense.

cnulan

The basis of collective action would initially rest upon self-preservation

The west has confused culture and civilization. In making the latter its paramount priority, it has nearly completely lost the former. So now we are subsumed within an immense, powerful, and nearly all-encompassing technology of living - which is acutely vulnerable and in thermodynamic decline due to its abject dependance on petroleum. This big machinery of living is in turn wrapped around a hollow collective psychological core where culture rightfully presides.

At this moment in time, we are precariously dependant on the floundering boat of oil-dependant western civilization, and have no alternative civilizing nucleus to proffer. To your point;

(ensuring that such a community has skilled and professional tradespeople to be self-sustaining)

I believe, as you have stated, that we should focus on the gulf-states area. The greatest concentration of black agriculture and civic power is in this region, as is the ocean going connectivity with the afro-latin world.

I don't believe that China will be useful or helpful to the afrofuture, but I believe that Cuba and Venezuela could be immensely helpful and that we here in America have the capacity $$$$, political mass, etc.., to engage with the afro-latin sphere reciprocally.

Cobb

One of the fundamental questions is the role of the mom. Having lived in So Cal for 8 years in 3 different neighborhoods, I can tell you that unless and until you have moms sharing responsibilities for each other's kids real community isn't happening.

In the first neighborhood, we had our kids interact with other kids at the public park through their various public programs. There were maybe three full-time staff, and my wife made pals with the number one woman who ran the program. We had her over for my barbecues and we wer basically tight.

In the second neighborhood, more of our kids were in school and most things were school based. There was a real friendliness among the parents at school but we weren't there long enough to establish a lot of bonds.

In the third neighborhood, where I live now, we can see things coming to a real fruition at about the fourth and fifth grade level. This is where kids really start to choose their friends, have sleepovers and parents are making the commitments to get to know each other. (You have to if it's going to be a sleepover). There are three or four families where we are close enough to spontaneously have their kids over our place or ours at theirs. This is a very different level of cooperation than just doing the 'activity based' relationships. When kids are playing sports on the same teams or scouting or going to the same church school, that's one level, but the sleepovers and family outings - that's a different level.

So for me personally there has been a progression of integration with other families that really doesn't seem to get into gear until kids are in the third grade. It becomes clear after a while, who the power moms are in the community. It's all about knowing the power moms.

Now I would say there's going to be a big difference in the quality of community based upon how many women are working. In the last two neighborhoods, there were plenty of stay at home mothers, and if you ask me, that is the single most important determining factor in the quality of community life. It's all about what's going on at 4:20, and if mom is not watching... well, you know what happens. If you shift the burden of organizing and watching children to public institutions, you will by definition get results that are not up to par. I don't believe you can invest properly without fundamentally altering the relationship between kids, the school and parents - which is to say that the school has to be greatly expanded. Where there are working or single mother families, the school has to be day care, park, babysitting, homework monitoring, communications exchange and trusted surrogate. I don't think that there is enough public money for that or that there ever will be, but I could see how making school a place where parents can pick up their kids up to 9pm at night would work.

cnulan

At some point, however, I do contend that we are going to have to contruct some sort of code of conduct or reconstruct some authentic spiritual basis from which we can all be on the same page to operate.

Creative competition in the context of an infinite game sums up my understanding of our unique cultural genius, and moreover, becomes the verifiable expression of a valid underlying spirituality. They shall be known by their Works. Going back to Oba T'Shaka's discussion, there are operational constants suffusing and informing collective black psychology. The trick and the challenge it seems to me, is to begin applying our cultural genius to the pragmatic infrastructural exigencies of our pressing immediate material needs, i.e., forging local instances of free standing black civilization.

One of the reasons I push the urban agriculture theme is that it's within everyone's reach, will create black business, and take aim at three real problem birds with one stone, i.e., jobs for youth, improved nutrition and health for blacks, and cross-generational, cross-gender creative competition outside the sphere of pure cultural production, i.e., turntablism, spoken word, dance, and graffiti.

So here we are, civilization modeling on the basis of our unique approach to cultural production, oh, and by the way, building on the pervasive contemporary expression of our collective genius, hiphop culture. Paraphrasing (or is that sampling?) from an article on Working Groups (Anthony Blake in particular and the Duversity should not be considered authoritative in this subject matter, though for the present discussion, what they've posted on the web is useful)

"There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play."

"The rules of a finite game may not change; the rules of an infinite game must change."

"Finite players play within boundaries; infinite players play with boundaries."

"Finite players are serious; infinite players are playful."

"Finite players win titles; infinite players have nothing but their names."

"Finite players are theatrical; infinite players are dramatic."

"A finite player consumes time; an infinite player generates time."

There is something playful and sufficient to itself about black culture, and once having returned our attentions to civilization building rather than sold-out or bought-in participation in an uncultured, dying civilization that is in violent conflict on multiple fronts, we will quickly begin to renew our confidence in ourselves.

Our code of cultural conduct should conform to the ‘politics of revelation’ and not to the ‘politics of salvation’.

That is to say, the usual relationship between client and consultant is that of "salvation": one has some sort of trouble, seeks out an expert, and the expert, on the basis of specialized knowledge, diagnoses the trouble and gives directions on the best way to solve it. It is the classic relationship between doctor and patient, but it may also be found between computer expert and intimidated user, accountant and business owner, clergy and congregant, pollster and politician.

In the modem, turbulent world, both the saviour and supplicant are in need of a collaborative approach to a new understanding of what is needed. This is the politic of revelation, where the new knowledge has to be entertained from wherever it may come.”

The politics of revelation builds on the self disclosure of the group as it chooses itself to be, in all the uncertainty and ambiguity of becoming."

Now add to this the simple instrumentality of democratic slashdotting, (not slamming websites because of slashdot posting, rather, the ranking, rating, and commenting capabilities slashdot provides) and voila, we've got a full-on, verifiable, popularly endorsed and constituted framework for ranking, rating, and measuring the percieved goodness of individual and collective Works by and within the community - something I refer to as cultural Showtime at the Apollo.

cnulan

Where there are working or single mother families, the school has to be day care, park, babysitting, homework monitoring, communications exchange and trusted surrogate. I don't think that there is enough public money for that or that there ever will be, but I could see how making school a place where parents can pick up their kids up to 9pm at night would work.

This is where the learning center telehub concept comes into play. The Dubois Learning Center operates a 190 foot radio tower providing high speed Internet access to 16 churches and three community centers up and down the Swope Corridor. Not only do we provide curricular content and testing services from our data center, focused on reading, math, science and technology, we will also begin providing cultural production frameworks that enable kids to use the technology to create and commercialize their own original cultural work products, whether musical, spoken word, graphical, literary, etc..., ($$$$ and economic opportunity in conjunction with mounting the technology learning curve.)

The unique topological advantage available in the hood, is that churches are ubiquitous enough to be within walking distance of everyone residing therein. Our objective is to have the Learning Center and its satellite operations in demand 24/7/365 - and frankly - those churches need to figure out ways to be more useful to the communities that they serve in the revelatory rather than salvatory fashion described in a previous comment.

This model can be replicated in just about any city with a black population density and topologially contiguous community where an organization owns a building, a little land, and possesses the desire to do so. Total cost of implementation is considerably less than $500K and can be operated on an annual budget of ~$100K. We don't want public money, but we'll take any and all no strings attached, tax deductible afrosticratic $$$ donated to the cause.

Temple3

i think we have something here...i would agree that the prospects of a long-term viable relationship with China are to questioned...however, China has worked constructively to complete some serious projects in Africa (infrastructure development, inviting African students to Chinese universities, training soldiers, etc.) for roughly half a century. it is hard to argue against a confluence of interests between African (continent and diaspora) and the chinese...moreover, there is no point in not having them on your side. the ultimate question, which may be a given, is that not unlike the US and the rest of the West, the chinese will not forge permanent alliances, only permanent interests.

kenya is a geo-politically valuable nation. it was viewed by east and west (during the "Cold War") as an entry point to land-locked nations in central africa...mombasa has been a coastal trading city for at least 500 years.

i think there is something to be said of an alliance with Venezuela and Cuba. the evidence is overwhelming that these would be productive alliances. however, there are limitations in seeking a pan-latino alliance. nations like columbia, r.d., honduras, costa rica, panama (?) could be fruitful. in fact, the r.d. (republica dominicana) has had the highest increase in income in the caribbean over the past few decades. there are other nations like Argentina (often referred to as the US of South America)where traction could parallel the process of making inroads in Montana or Vermont.

Temple3

It's not clear to me that the black community has "politics" that can be described as humanistic, maternal and agrarian. I am requesting clarification.

MIB

Nulan and Cobb have expanded upon my points re: Black politics defined, AKA values. These items transcend simple ideological orientation, party affiliation, gender, and other 'normative' constraints.

To be 'Black' involves a prioritization of humanism, maternalism and agrarianism as values. Contrast these constructs against mainstream Western culture, which is materialistic, paternal and institutionalized; a culture which systemically depreciates and marginalizes individuals and diverging thought.
I believe 'Black' people sense the individual and collective isolation, if not its causes, but permit ourselves to disproportionally influenced by the dominant culture.

To reconcile 'Blackness' with the dominant culture and bring about socioeconomic parity, it's important that Af-Ams define our own institutions, i.e.; family, education, agriculture, etc., for representing and advancing Black values.

Temple3

I can't go there just yet...i don't intuitively accept the argument because i question the extent to which these three principles reflect, rather than shape, circumstances encountered on a fairly consistent basis by african folk.

i believe the notion of humanism must be held up to some serious questions. it's not clear to me how humanism prevailed at the time when rival groups in western africa were able to seize and sell humans for material (guns, etc.) for centuries, europeans were not able to roll into central africa and impose their will - they negotiated numbers, terms and compensation with strong coastal kingdoms who could make trades. white folks did not simply show up with guns and bum rush the show. in addition, the trading pattern was established prior to europeans (ie. the Portuguese and Dutch) seeking enslaved african labor. so, i recognize that humanism can take place in a context that does not include individual liberty (collective obligations and other practices can take precedence), but i would like to be clearer about what our humanism looks like across time and space - especially when circumstances like war, pestilence, famine and crises of faith impinge upon the normal day...

it just may be that for every example of humanism in the face of adversity, we can find three or four examples of "inhumanity" (whatever that means - since i believe we are the only mammals that kill for sport, money, psycho-erotic pleasure, etc.) it may also be that the incidence of humanism is no greater or less among african populations than other populations facing similar crises...in other words, if we do and everyone else does it, it probably won't be binding for us...if we do it, but not when it gets tight, is that really us? how tenacious is the practice?

with respect to the "maternal", i am tempted to argue that this is as much a function of our geological inheritance as some type of "inherited-transmitted" cultural trait...i would appreciate it if you might discuss the IMPACT of matrilineal vs. patrilineal organization and the IMPACT of matriarchal vs. patriarchal structures. how these various options (which are not mutually exclusive - ie. matrilineal & patriarchal) benefit women/collectives and subsequently constitute "maternal politics" is the heart of my question. or more directly, if a "maternal politics" is an operative part of blackness how does "blackness" override the misogynst impulses of american pop culture and/or islamo/christian patriarchal fascism?

agriculture is the dominant form of food collection, storage and delivery...it has largely displaced hunting/nomadic lifestyles - but it has also introduced an era of undermining the equity of women in most societies...folks like jared diamond -guns, germs and steel- posit that women had a higher station in hunter/gatherer societies than in agricultural societies because in agricultural societies, the emphasis on child-rearing and food production...this may seem counter-intuitive, but it is consistent with much of what is reported from the caribbean and the continent with respect to the economic/political rights of women with respect to men...in a society when men and women are on the move (nomadic), child-rearing is not a priority, and the woman is as likely as a man to be packin' (bow n' arrow; knife; other food-collection implement).

and as for agrarian...what does that mean with respect to commerce (trading across seas over time and space) or technological/innovative (advancements even in the belly of the beast)...i would also reject agrarian as a spacial inheritance and an element of our enslavement in the western theatre under europeans prior to the industrial revolution...i don't think this term adequately captures the roles of africans enslaved in the east...nor do i believe it captures the fullness of african development in other areas...agriculture may have been the hallmark of kemet or mali, but that was not the case for songhay (fishing)...nor was it the case for ancient ghana (gold trading), the asante were enriched through trading in gold and captive labor...and i believe there is enough variety to delve deeper into this...certainly land ownership is important, but agriculture as a definition of blackness seems a bit off the mark. i would submit that folks simply do what they do through a very complex system of trial and error...typically empires predicate their wealth on a secondary or tertiary activity after they have stabilized food supplies...therefore, given where we are and where we need to go, agriculture should be viewed as foundational, but certainly not definitive.

Temple3

http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/050730/why_africa_goes_hungry.html?.v=2

The question of the basis for our collective action is not intended simply for an American African audience, but for a global african community. the situation in niger is illustrative of the depth of the problem...the notion of intra-continental tariffs in Africa must be revisited as well. Thoughts??

cnulan

Since Africans cannot surmount practical constraints to instantiate a pan-African community, much as Europeans cannot instantiate a pan-European community despite far fewer material constraints, I'm quite certain that I cannot perceive the existence of a global african community. To me, this notion doesn't even make it to the level of interesting hypothetical.

My thought and my Work are channelled into the restoration of authentic, vital and self-determining community in local cells here in America first and foremost. Until that happens, it seems to me that everything else is merely conversation...,

bibtecario

There's no question that what constitutes a healthy community varies depending on what is functional at a given time (We've seen this on the Continent where polygamy or polyandry was apropos or with Kamitian folk migrating to the hinterland where seafaring trade took a backseat to the acquisition of land cultivation/domestication of animal skills); and, thus, that what constituted a community/society-sustaining indigenous commercial class of folk largely depended, somewhat, upon what the land coupled with African ingenuity could yield.

I used the example of Black folk, here, migrating to Houston (as many of us have migrated to ATL) because the Ocean is a great resource and, as such, such a city represents a great skeletal framework where ideas like Cobb's important insight,
"I can tell you that unless and until you have moms sharing responsibilities for each other's kids real community isn't happening," as well as Nulan's invaluable model, "One of the reasons I push the urban agriculture theme is that it's within everyone's reach, will create black business, and take aim at three real problem birds with one stone, i.e., jobs for youth, improved nutrition and health for blacks, and cross-generational, cross-gender creative competition outside the sphere of pure cultural production, i.e., turntablism, spoken word, dance, and graffiti," constitute the very sinews and organs of a healthy community. Indeed, Nulan point that, "There is something playful and sufficient to itself about black culture, and once having returned our attentions to civilization building rather than sold-out or bought-in participation in an uncultured, dying civilization that is in violent conflict on multiple fronts, we will quickly begin to renew our confidence in ourselves," represents a healthy confluence of the desired effect. The challenge lies, once again full circle with the necessity of unifying principles that would lead folk to act in concert.

"These individuals are fallible and our fidelity must be on the principle...and our practice should steer clear of judgment - even as we hold one another accountable."

While the individuals are indeed fallible and our fidelity must be on the principle in order to avoid the cults of personality trap, I maintain that it would be impossible to avoid or "steer clear" of judgment in "our practice" because what else is accountability but judgement?
For as talented and brilliant as both Condi and Colin may be, the fact remains that, in my humble opinion, they are both accessories to war crimes (especially, Colin, as he violated his own Powell Doctrine to promulgate bogus reasoning for the unprovocated attack) in the unprovocated, ungoing attack [against Iraq] and they both, just like the rest of the cabal that comprises the Bush cabinet, should have their days at the Haig, just like Slobodan, the Nazi's and others.
Therefore, I couldn't imagine seating those two in a think tank, inasmuch as they might possess indispensible brilliance and experience.

Perhaps reconciling such a conundrum requires a paradigmatic shift, to some degree, where Nulan's introduction of the finite v. infinite game may prove to be of some utility.

cnulan

best case scenario...build homes, schools, hospitals with some conservative cat you can't stand intellectually, but respect as a person of integrity and vision and commitment - and the only time y'all argue is over a beer or three or five at the lounge you've built to provide a social venue for your collective.

Task-orientation and contractual obligation are essential to the effectiveness of the collective..,

While the individuals are indeed fallible and our fidelity must be on the principle in order to avoid the cults of personality trap, I maintain that it would be impossible to avoid or "steer clear" of judgment in "our practice" because what else is accountability but judgement?

Colin has an invaluable access, exposure, and relationship set. I believe that he has played his hand at the biggest stakes table, but that he was always betting on the future welfare of the children. After being dealt some truly stank hands, he did fold up and walk away.

Condi..., {sigh}

The beauty of task orientation and contractual obligation is that it imposes accountability transcending lip service to principle. The underlying rules of the game ARE TRULY ours to dictate.

Temple3

a subtle point here...

i would argue that accountability is distinct from judgment in the respect that judgment in the absence of accountability looks like ostracism, shame or some other form on non-binding censure that relegates the judged to some perceived margin - and that this process of judgment occurs as a de facto social process - rather than as the result of a collective convened to weigh the 'facts and evidence.'

accountability without judgment looks a bit different. at the least, it is not a rush to judgment (which is my principal concern). just as we have been miseducated about all of our leaders, we cannot assume to know the salient facts of a particular case based on newspaper reports, blogs or 'common knowledge.' this is tantamount to asante's recounting of european proofs obtained through ordeals, oaths and deeds. this method of proof still obtains today in the usa, but it cannot be used effectively to our benefit. yesterday, i had a convo with a bruh about king and whether or not he was the integrationist (meaning 'social' as the primary focus, versus economic and political and cultural) he is believed to be...i argued 'no' on the basis of some research i've done...we had a different opinion and not to say that he was wrong, but his opinion was based on conventional wisdom and the prevailing depiction of the past 30 years...in fact, king is quite clear about the need for black folk to cleave to our cultural roots and not get caught up in the cultural practices and principles of americana...

so, accountability should look like a balanced rendering/interpretation of the issue combined with an enforceable exclusion from a specific set of privileges, rights, activities and/or benefits...just a reprimand or censure results in a formal change of status...the judgment follows the review and is not a moral "blacker than thou" castigation, but an operational rebuke from black institutions (wagon train charters, etc.) which precludes participation based on patterns of practice.

Temple3

cnu wrote: "Since Africans cannot surmount practical constraints to instantiate a pan-African community, much as Europeans cannot instantiate a pan-European community despite far fewer material constraints, I'm quite certain that I cannot perceive the existence of a global african community. To me, this notion doesn't even make it to the level of interesting hypothetical."

i'm not following you...if the verifiable evidence of a pan-euro community looks like ongoing collaboration and cooperation (even amidst competition) between intellectual, military, cultural, political, economic, spiritual (read religious), informational and interpersonal networks, then i certainly believe white folks have achieved a considerable measure of this...

the issue in question is not one of uniformity, but a question of spatial and temporal connectedness among the progeny and adherents to the teleology, soteriology and material/spiritual eschatology of a singular worldview...

the question of whether africans can achieve this in areas where we find one another (like New York, Houston, DC, and Miami) is the issue. i think that a pan-african community will look like great ideas and practices being replicated as was the case in the 50's and 60's and 70's. it may not look like a real "community" except in those places where a significant number of diasporan and continental africans can come together. in places like detroit, chicago, kc, atl, the numbers are not as high and so the chances for cross-fertilization and collaboration may be fewer - but the only barriers are our willingness to engage our brethren and build the right projects...

btcario and i used to kick it with a number of continental bruhs back at U-M and the vision and desire to collaborate were there, but the organizational energy to identify and fulfill the project did not materialize...the concerns on the ground here are as real as they are there...but if we really get with what Gatto is kicking, we could do ourselves a great service by getting our children out of these schools and onto some of these projects that would accelerate their learning, introduce them to the world, and enrich the lives of all.

on a certain level, this is a logical conduit to Oprah's work in Africa and Chicago.

cnulan

i'm not following you...

I have more than enough real Work to do right here in KC - all the time. That having been said, I will be spending time in Ilinois in the not-too-distant, as an outgrowth of the Work I do right here. Some Chicagoans have gotten past the conversational stage and are stepping up to attempt to replicate the Work they've seen exemplified right here.

There are a couple of Nigerian and Senegalese participants in the Work I do right here. To the extent that these brothers learn the Work and its structuro-functional model, take that value home and propagate it, I'm supportive.

Until that happens, the potential for it doesn't even make it to the level of an interesting hypothetical for me. Meanwhile, I welcome the involvement of African brothers who demonstrate ability and contribute tangibly to my Work right here.

The willingness to engage has always been present as an interesting hypothetical. I see few if any results manifesting from these long-standing good intentions.

Two weeks ago, on an early sunday morning, for example, you posted and unposted here on Moblogging. Yesterday, I completed the implementation of a german moblogg and did a preliminary test. Today I'll finish testing. At the time you posted and unposted, I wasn't even aware of the possibility, now I have the capability.

Something else you'd said about utility of the blogosphere factored into that effort...,

on a certain level, this is a logical conduit to Oprah's work in Africa and Chicago

I'll bite my tongue on the temptation to posit a highly judgemental guess at what that conduit and its level might be?

Temple3

as i said, a pan-african community (at this pre-nascent stage) is going to look like what you outlined, diasporand and continental black folk working in communities with one another - and hopefully replicating in other locales where we are living...that sounds about right...moreover, as i've stated before, the basis for collective action, to my mind, is self-determination rather than unity - and it's a different type of work - and it sounds like the type of work you're doing in KC. the work is too demanding and the connections too tenuous for there to be much more than that...

http://myhero.com/myhero/hero.asp?hero=oprahhero
"Oprah has also created the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. The school will teach girls to be the best human beings they can be, training them to become decision makers and leaders, allowing them to explore the changing world through advanced education techniques and advanced technology, including a telecommunications system. The latter will allow Oprah to teach from Chicago. South African teachers and administrators will be selected from the best and the brightest of South Africa's educators. The Oprah Winfrey Foundation will contribute $10 million to build and maintain the academy with additional funding to come from the Guateng Deparment of Education."

the connection, here, is in the area of education...and using education/schools as a mechanism for building infrastructure in communications, transportation, and health care. all of these ideas have been part of development theory for at least three decades, but oprah's loot and roots to south africa could portend the development of something unforeseen prior to the emergence of a black billionaire.

Temple3

and no, that's not my website.

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