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September 12, 2005

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Negrorage

Since you're feeling random...how about fielding a random question from John McWhorter?

'In response to occasional “blacker-than-thou” charges that arise within the black community, it is often said that one need not display certain cultural traits to be “black"–one need not be a good dancer, wear dreadlocks, eat fried chicken, or even speak the dialect. Clearly, however, a black person culturally indistinguishable from a white person would indeed be considered “not black.” What, then is the essence of “black"?' -John McWhorter

Go! Go! Go!

DarkStar

Clearly, however, a black person culturally indistinguishable from a white person would indeed be considered “not black.” What, then is the essence of “black"?'

I don't accept his premise, thus the question is garbage.

See the acceptance of rap as a great counter example.

HTH.

blackhacker

I still don't understand why speculating can drive up gas prices so fast, but reality causes downward adjustments to happen slowly.

Managing Expectations. Everywhere all you here is "gas is high, gas is high". And in deed it is high. But once the public gets used to paying a price point, they can charge that forever. Normally this principle works in reverse. Say Wal-mart charging 3 or 4 bucks lower than record stores for CDs. Eventually the record stores will have to do the same to compete. And the price will never go back up that high again, without good reason. Thtas why companies hate lowering prices. It becomes very hard for them to go back up. But with gasoline Expectation Management is built in. We are used to seeing the price fluctuate over the short term and rise over the long term. Until we can find something else to put in our cars to get to work, thats the way its gonna be.

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